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LIVING WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

Understanding your diagnosis

SCHIZOPHRENIA IS NO ONE’S FAULT

Nearly 2.4 million American adults have schizophrenia. While the exact cause is not known, experts think that a combination of family history (genetics), environmental factors, and certain chemical imbalances in the brain may be risk factors for developing schizophrenia.

COMMON SCHIZOPHRENIA SYMPTOMS

People with schizophrenia may have many different types of symptoms, including the ones described below

The types of symptoms someone has and how severe they are change over time.

HALLUCINATIONS

This is when you see or hear things that aren’t there. You may see people or hear voices talking to you even when you’re alone.

DELUSIONS

When you hold on to false beliefs even with proof that those beliefs are not true or logical.

DISORGANIZED THINKING

If you are finding it hard to organize thoughts, it can make it hard to talk clearly or tell people what you are thinking in a way they can understand.

SOCIAL WITHDRAWAL

You may not want to take part in everyday activities like work, school or social events.

You may have questions about how ARISTADA® (aripiprazole lauroxil) can help.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

There’s a lot you can do to help yourself

SET A TREATMENT GOAL

A personal goal is something that can give you a sense of satisfaction and success.

Choose a daily task that you want to reach that’s based on you, your abilities, and your needs.

Once you have decided on your treatment goal and talked about it with your healthcare team, write it down and make a commitment to do what you can to reach it. Keeping a daily journal can help you monitor your thoughts and feelings, as well as set and keep track of personal goals.

Your healthcare team is here to help you. Talk openly with them about how you are doing reaching your treatment goal.

STAY HEALTHY

Work with your treatment team to find a nutritionist or other resources to help you learn more about a balanced diet.

A simple activity like taking a walk can be a positive change. Talk to your healthcare provider first before you begin any activity.

Managing stress is an important part of your treatment plan. You can listen to or play music, practice yoga or meditation, get more sleep, or create art.

If you think you have a problem with drugs and/or alcohol, talk to your treatment team about getting help. And if you smoke, your healthcare provider may need to help you when you’re ready to quit. Remember: Do not drink alcohol while you receive ARISTADA.

Your personal journal

Here is a coloring book and journal. Use this resource to color in the pictures or draw some of your very own. You can also write down and keep track of your treatment goals, keep a daily journal to write out how you're feeling and write down any questions for your healthcare provider.

If you’re caring for a loved one with schizophrenia, you may have some questions

INFORMATION FOR CAREGIVERS