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INFORMATION FOR CAREGIVERS

Helping the person you care for

YOUR ROLE IS VERY IMPORTANT

As someone who takes care of a loved one with schizophrenia, you are often responsible for a range of activities, such as accessing services within the healthcare system and coordinating many different aspects of care. Here are some tips to help along the way.

BE REALISTIC

It’s important to have a routine and set appropriate treatment goals.

BE INFORMED

The more you know, the better prepared you’ll be to handle situations when they arise.

BE RELAXED

Create a calm, relaxing, and structured environment for the person you care for.

BE SUPPORTIVE

There’s power in being positive. Be optimistic and encouraging, and support independence.

“It’s true what they say. You can’t take care of someone else until you care for yourself. So, I try to do 1 thing just for me each day.”

– Steve, cares for his wife who lives with schizophrenia

TIPS TO HELP

UNDERSTANDING THE TREATMENT TEAM

Your healthcare team may be made up of several different doctors, therapists, nurses, counselors, and other specialists.

PSYCHIATRISTS

PSYCHIATRISTS

Physicians who specialize in caring for people with schizophrenia and other mental health needs. They can prescribe and monitor medications.

PSYCHOLOGISTS

PSYCHOLOGISTS

Therapists who work with people to find ways to manage their condition and help them cope with their symptoms, life issues, and mental health problems.

NURSING STAFF

NURSING STAFF

Nurses care for people with mental illness or mental distress, such as schizophrenia, and may also inject ARISTADA INITIO™ (aripiprazole lauroxil), ARISTADA® (aripiprazole lauroxil), and other medicines.

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS & NURSE PRACTITIONERS

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS & NURSE PRACTITIONERS

Professionals who specialize in psychiatric/mental health services under the supervision of a psychiatrist.

SOCIAL WORKERS & CASE MANAGERS

SOCIAL WORKERS & CASE MANAGERS

Professionals who support, counsel, and offer advice to people and their families; coordinate mental health services to help with recovery plans; and may also help find housing, transportation, and employment.

PEER SPECIALISTS

PEER SPECIALISTS

Peer specialists are people with a mental health condition who are trained to help others with their recovery.

Keep track of who’s on your healthcare team

TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF

It’s important to balance work, family, and caregiving. That includes looking after yourself.

RECHARGE YOUR BATTERIES

RECHARGE YOUR BATTERIES

You can’t pour from an empty cup! Find time to take part in activities that make you happy—and enjoy them without feeling guilty.

MANAGE YOUR STRESS

MANAGE YOUR STRESS

Reduce your levels of stress by getting enough sleep each night, eating well, limiting your intake of alcoholic drinks, and avoiding situations that you know may cause anxiety for you and the person you care for.

NOTICE THE POSITIVE

NOTICE THE POSITIVE

Focus on the day and the joy you can find in it. The little things that go right can add up to a positive experience. If you keep a journal, make sure to write down 1 good thing each day.

LIVE HEALTHY

LIVE HEALTHY

Make sure you are taking care of yourself and seeing your healthcare provider for your annual checkups.

BE MINDFUL OF YOUR FEELINGS

BE MINDFUL OF YOUR FEELINGS

Being a caregiver can be overwhelming. What is important is to notice these feelings without passing judgment and then refocus on the job at hand.

REACH OUT FOR SUPPORT

REACH OUT FOR SUPPORT

You are not alone. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Join a support program for caregivers in your area.

Help and support are available

RELY ON THE HEALTHCARE TEAM

Reach out to a professional healthcare team when you see warning signs that the person you care for is not doing well. Once you know what to look for, you can get the help the person you care for needs.

You don’t have to do it alone. There is support every step of the way.

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